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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 190 (some duplicates have been removed)
union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour
on the streets of alexandria ahead of the referendum on egypt's new constitution. >> relations between russia and the european union in focus as vladimir putin plays -- pays a visit to brussels. >> and today is the start of a new era according to the ancient mayan calendar and the old one draws to an end. in egypt, the final round of a national referendum on the countries' disputed new constitution is set to start on saturday morning. most observers expect the constitution to be approved. unofficial results from the first round of voting last week showed 57% in favor of the document. >> critics say the constitution is to islamist-based and ignores the rights of women and minorities in the country. in the run-up to the vote, opponents and supporters of morsi clashed again on friday. >> "our souls and our blood we sacrifice to islam," they chanted in alexandria. thousands of muslim brotherhood supporters rallied in the city ahead of the voting on egypt's referendum on the proposed constitution. >> my message to the egyptian people is saying yes to stability. production needs to start moving. ec
in russia. siberia's move to emergency shelters as more than 100 people lose their lives -- siberia inspect -- siberians move to emergency shelters. do not ever lose hope for peace -- that is the message from the pope this christmas. >> pope benedict delivered his twice yearly address from the balcony of st. peter's basilica today. the pontiff touched on political themes as well, calling for peace in syria and appealing to italians to embrace the spirit of cooperation in upcoming elections. >> tens of thousands of people showed up in st. peter's square to hear benedict's message, and millions to and in worldwide. >> tens of thousands of people turned out to hear the pope's christmas message. the square erupted in applause as the pontiff stepped out to address the crowd. he revisited one of the themes of his christmas eve message -- the wish for peace in the middle east. turning and i to syria, he called for an end to the conflict -- turning an eye to syria. the pope appealed to those responsible to stop the bloodshed and slaughter of innocent people. he called for dialogue in order to find
the administration thought it had to take a lot more assertive action. >> what is the pressure of russia, on moscow to dole with this? they've been backing their ally syria. where are they? >> secretary clinton met with the foreign minister of russia a couple of days ago. obviously russia has backed another loser, its propensity in these things. i think they even see this now. probably the best-case scenario is there's some sort of soft landing where assad is offered an exile deal, gets out of the picture. and then you start the retribution massacres and it could turn into something extremely ugly. the hope is russia will get on board and be constructive. the foreign minister said good things but we'll see what russia does. >> what does an intervention looks like? >> if chemical weapons are used, i think it looks a lot like the air strikes in libya. you have to destroy some of those major stockpiles of chemical weapons. if they start to lose control and there are fores that hezbollah might get ahold of them, you might see some special forces on the ground. the idea of chemical weapons, especially f
authoritarian countries and around the world may be as helpful for me to mention those. i did time in russia, china, egypt, venezuela and even a few more. but i'm looking out of the book and what i set out to do is look at the struggle between democrats and dictators. which you find this is a wonderful political science literature out there on the topic. but in fact, it's actually lived by people in the very concrete way on a day-to-day basis. just a couple hours before he came over here this morning, many people are profiled in russia were just arrested. this is a fluid stream of income late and i wanted to look at how these two sides are facing off against each other. one of the things i don't think we often realize is the battle between democracies and dictatorships going on today as opposed to the not so distant past is actually almost always die struggle between individuals. and so why did i choose the countries i chose? i chose them because these are some of the most sophisticated regimes. what you find as it's actually, i think you could guess this from 20 above and if you are in anyw
aadodop children from russia, but that might come to an end thanks to a acontroversi controversial bill russia's parliament. >>> he's taking a bow. he's getting a second chance at a job he quit five years ago. japan's new prime minister making a stunning comeback. >>> as the sound of gunfire rings out in syrian neighborhoods, the country's military police chief has reported defected to the other side. ng. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her
stakeholders' liked iran and russia. >>thank you for your answers. i'm looking for something a little bit more specific. what is the relation between the new coalition and the military council? do you think they can become an administrative body for the revolution or a government in exile as you just described? >> is there a follow-up question? >> the new coalition actually put three things they have to do. the first to form a new government and to form a military council, and in the third thing the to play a role in the humanitarian assistance or humanitarian aid. the debate right now within the new coalition, are we able to form a government until we get it in guarantees from the international community, suc. restated three examples before of government in exile. if there is no recognition of the international community, there is nothing the government in exile can do. the second thing is the financial assistance. i said before, after the formation of the serbian national council, six months we don't have what we need to do. you cannot work as a workin exile with individual budgets. the rela
has denied any intention of using chemical weapons. russia, a key syrian ally, dismissed the intelligence reports as rumors. yesterday in istanbul, russian president vladimir putin said he understands turkey's concerns about border security, but he warned that deploying patriot missiles could raise fears of a wider conflict. meanwhile, inside syria intense fighting flared again near damascus today. amateur video showed government warplanes carrying out new arrayeds. the syrian capital has seen escalating violence in the last week as rebels try to close the noose on president bashar al assad's regime and the military tries to recapture lost ground. amid the fighting, the state news agency reported that rebel more tar fire killed nine students and a teacher at a school outside damascus today. the opposition also reported the incident but did not say who fired the mortar. meanwhile, there are meanwhile, there are indications that russia's position on syria may be changing. the "new york times" reports that the russians had agreed to a new strategy to persuade president assad
? senator clinton -- secretary clinton meeting with russia, what can we do and what's the next step if they don't listen. >> it's a complex world the president is going to lead in. >> can i enter, you cover these issues all the time and did a lead story on nightly news on this topic. the question fors the president is ultimately what do you do when your foreign policy has been premised on bringing american troops home, at a time when american power and influence is needed particularly in the middle east, but there are no easy answers. this i think is what sort of calls out for an obama doctrine in a second term. he doesn't seem to have one at the moment which is a big issue. >> and doesn't have a foreign policy team yet. he's still wrestling with those decisions. more on that to come. david gregory, thank you very much. chris cizilla. coming up sunday on "meet the press," the fiscal cliff debate. the latest between house republican whip kevin mccarthy and assistant senate majority leader dick durbin, the two men who have been at the table. congress hearing from all sides on the fisc
with russia's top diplomat and with the special envoy to the syrian crisis who said nothing sensational came out of it. but clinton and the russian foreign minister did agree to try to find some, quote, creative ways to end the bloodshed. and it looks like russia's stedfast support for assad could be nearing its end. the influential russian lawmaker who is tight with vladimir putin said, quote, we have shared and do share the opinion that the existing government in syria should carry out its functions, but time has shown its task is beyond its strength. back in washington, a spokesman for secretary clinton warned of the perils that the syrian people would confront even in a post assad era. >> we know these groups, al-qaeda and others, troy to take advantage of the environment assad has fostered over the last year or so. it is important that they -- that the syrian people get a government out of all of this that is representative of their desires and as separations. they -- aspirations. they don't want to trade one for the other. >> that has been a concern for u.s. policy makers in all of the
, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning yet. >> the president of the united states made it clear there will be consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using chemical weapons on their own people. lou: neither the white house or pentagon elaborating on what the cons -- consequences would be, but having russia back them would be a determined outcome made by the promise of president obama in dealing with russia after winning a second term as he remarked to the russian president thinking they were off microphone as they met in south korea back in march. >> after my election, i have more flexibility. >> i understand. i just need permission -- lou: a full report on the disturbing turn of events in syria and the
receives 40% of its natural gas from russia. german investment and technology will be playing a key role in the project. >> it is a victory for russian president vladimir putin. they looked on as the first segments were welded together in western siberia. it is three weeks since bulgaria gave the go-ahead for the project. the last transit country to do so. >> this project has the political support of all partner countries. all have signed the contracts and taken their investment decisions. the pipeline will move huge amounts of gas. 63 billion cubic meters. >> that is how much gas sell stream is to move once it is completed by 2019. it is being routed from the black sea to italy and bypasses the current transit country, ukraine. moscow has argued with kiev over fees and gas prices for years. a feud that has often cut off gas supplies to western europe. >> south stream could soon make ukraine much more willing to compromise. kiev could even agree to some form of russian involvement in its pipeline system and its modernization. >> the launch of south stream gives it a head start. and this
the arrests, an allegation he denies. russia's foreign minister says he will welcome any country's offer for a safe haven for al assad. he also says syria is using chemical weapons to keep them safe from rebels. united states has warned syria against using the weapons. the army has shelled several districts in the capital. an armed group says it is preparing to impose a no-fly zone over the city. >> we have intelligence proving the regime is using commercial flights to transport troops and military gear to murder unarmed civilian people. we issued this warning to all civilians to refrain from using commercial planes to avoid being used as human shields. any plane in the sky will be targeted by anti-aircraft missiles. we have imposed a no-fly zone in this province. this will come into effect within three days. >> let's hear from our correspondent who has an update on the turkish-syrian border. >> an ultimatum was issued. we saw the video on the internet. they told the local population you have to do your duty to take out assad's forces. you have to open the door to rebels or we will launc
here that might be changing, and that is russia's position. if russia unloads their support of assad, i think assad is almost gone, and you are seeing that happening with assad saying he's going to use some of these chemical weapons. it's desperation. what i think we also are seeing is stronger pressure from some of the other surrounding countries, turkey, qatar, i think the european union is seeing the effects of assad falling and by the way, the use of chemical weapons hasn't happened. they've brought some of the sarin together. >> i wonder if some of these chemical weapons could have been transferred from iraq and lead up to the war. dick cheney said last night, andy, that our alleys no longer trust us and our allies and our enemies no longer fear us. what do you think of that? >> well, look. i think he's right. i think in this equation it's clear that president obama again has moved the goal post on a commitment that he made. that said, i must say i'm more concerned about the assad successor regime and the haste of the administration. i think actually the president's been -- i don't
the u.s. and russia. susan, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. intelligence reports are suggesting as this regime gets closer to falling, syrian president, bashir al assad could release sirin gas on the people there to subdue the rebellion. this would be a new phase of the war. it has the u.s. uniting with russia to stop it and some here on capitol hill calling for u.s. military intervention. rockets streak across the syrian sky as the battle between rebel forces and troops move to outskirts of the capital of damascus. jeffrey white says it's only a matter time before the bloody civil war is over. >> you can feel it. you can sense it. looks like the regime is being defeated. >> reporter: intelligence officials say chemical weapons believed to be stored at this syrian base have been primed and ready for use. >> we remain very concerned. very concerned that as the opposition advances in particular on damascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter: so far the u.s. has been very reluctant to use military force to help the over
think -- we know we're on the side of right. there's one big ondestruction, and that is russia. russia is a series of clients of russia's, putin has said, you guys, you americans, you can't be sank moneyus about how people live their lives. you want everybody to be like the united states. okay. you saw what happens when you try to foment democracy in places that aren't ready for it. we're here to tell you that if you try to upend assad, even if he is going to ethwe'll go out of business -- >> on his own accord. >> on his own, if you try to do that, you won't like the result, and we are reluktant to go do something that's not going to have a positive effect. we're listening to what putin said. he makes some sense for once. >> colonel jab jacobs. jack, as always, good to see you, sir. >> thanks for having me on the program. >> starting at midnight on saturday, gay and lesbian couple wills faebl be able to legally get married in this country. maine becoming one of nine states to legalize marriage equality when voters approved a ballot initiative in november, but the state by state legisla
to meet with the envoy to syria. across barbra himybill: russia s discussion in moscow. earlier in a week there was a report it was pulling support away from damascus. has that bent case? and why the relationship with russia so critical. >> reporter: it's one of the countries syria will listen to. russia could have sway over syrian president assad. >> the best issue we have is russia. russia stood up and told him to stop the chemical weapons issue and he backed off. but now he's back at it again. >> reporter: if assad does leave the immediate problem for the international community is who will take over in syria. then another key issue is how and who will secure the chemical weapons? bill: we are awaiting word from the pentagon and when that happt to you. martha: sarin gas is one of the world's most dangerous chemical weapons. experts say it has 500 times as toxic quality as cyanide does. 100 milligrams, which is one drop, can kill the average person in minutes if he or she is not given an immediate antedote. bill: syria depend on money from its oil exports. 9% of which are purchased by e
uncertain. billionaire investor and russia's wealthiest man alisher usmanov told cnbc's geoff cutmore that rebalance of growth is need. >> 2013 will be a year where we need to search for solutions. there is a big discussion going on about the state of the global economy. everyone is involved in that debate, in that discussion about wa to do. governments, central banks, economists, businessmen, scholars. so as far as i'm concerned, what really worried me and what i think is the real cause of the uncertainty is the enormous disparity that exists between the various monetary and other derivatives on the one hand and the global gdp. the derivatives, surpass many, many times the global gdp. there is too much of that. a mechanism needs to be found to reduce this disparity, minimize it. this is the cause of the instability, the volatility, of stagnation and sometimes even political crisis. so some mechanism to get out of this disparity will need to be found. and so what i'm hoping is that in 2013, the central banks of the united states, europe, and china will find a solution to at stop the g
rights and supporters say boosts egypt's political stability. >>> and russia's upper house of parliament has approve adverse hal measure banning address adoption of russian children by americans. the legislation goes to putin for signing. this move is seen as retaliation for a law president obama signed earlier this month imposing travel and human rights restrictions. and i'll have a full report on this story later in our 6:00 p.m. hour. every year they have about 1,000 children adopted from russia by americans, but all of that could be put on hold. and it's a unclear also what's going to happen to the cases pending. but again, we'll have much more on the story coming up at 6:00 so people can tune in again. >> can't wait to see it. thanks so much. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, a pair of wounded firefighters. welcome to our viewers around the world. you're in "the situation room." we begin with today's heart if the dealt thank you from survivors of a christmas eve shooting. j the firefighters had just arrived at a burning home when a sniper opened fire severely woundi
. russia. the blast ripped through an apartment building in the central city. officials say it happened during construction work. a gas container reportedly exploded on upper level of a 10 story building. dozens of people living nearby had to evacuate. cochings seized record cash of drugs in a mountain village. they found 15 tons of cocaine worth $450 million in an underground chamber beneath the home. traffickers had reportedly felony in the drugs from venezuela. hun hun door honduras a major shipping corridor. caught a rare chinese sturgeon. the indangerred species is said it be so old it lived among the dinosaurs. kept it in a tank where alerting police. officials released it into the sea some 15 miles offshore. belgium a new electronic christmas tree. replacing the famous fir tree. the 70-foot tall creation has led's and video production screen. for a few bucks you can climb its staircase for a full view of the famous plaza. proceeds go to a charity for the homeless and that's a wrap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >> share the holidays with the share everything pla
that we have right now to help get him out and to get him away from this is russia. russia stood up and told him to stop the chemical weapon issue, and he backed off. now that he's at it again, i think russia needs to stand up and hopefully they will. it's also good to hear that some of the arab countries are trying to find a way to get him out. you know, we don't know whether or not he's lost his mind, that he's scared, that we just don't know what's going to happen, but this could be a leverage for him to find a way to get out and to find a way to take his family somewhere in the world. >> greta: there's always the problem even if he goes, if he gets aasylu siel some place, whs going to take over and secure the chemical weapons. that's always been israel's fear. if assad fallless, who takes over? >> that's what we do, find the chem and biological weapons. syria was a more sophisticated country than libya, but we know what happened in libya. i've had conversations with numerous americans from syria, a lot of people, doctors and people who have connections in their families that are
, west, and the south. >> of the u.s. state department is criticizing russia oppose the upper house banning americas from adopting russian children. the bill will go to the president for his approval. several protesters were arrested outside of the building. >> outside parliament, the knowledge of the quickly with demonstrators protesting as the bill which bars americans from adopting russian orphans. >> is not useful for our children or our national security or priorities. this lot is draconian and should not be adopted by the council. >> they unanimously backed the proposals which only leaves the signature of the president to become law. it is one of the toughest pieces of anti-u.s. legislation in years past in retaliation for an american law that would impose sanctions on russian officials implicated in human rights offenses. 16,000 russian orphans have been adopted by russian families. opponents say the real victims will be the children. kids will stays, orphans. they have visas and they will not be treated properly. it is likely a death sentence for them. >> adoptions by americ
business, giving you the power to prosper. >> russia hosting peace talks to end the civil unrest over 20 months. will they encourage president aside to step down? let's go to our correspondent from jerusalem. >> so far the russians have said they will not encourage aside to step down but it must be solved from dialogue. and he said he felt syria could go into a bloody mess but some feel we already have of bloody mess with 45,000 people killed. the rebels tightened the noose on some of the larger power base like damascus and other areas where there is fighting right now but the russians have been the biggest protector that if some point* russia will abandon assad the rebels think russia will lose all influence which is what they do not want to do. then there would be a transitional government, of constitution, the election for right now it does not seem they will take any part of the deal. the human toll is astronomical refugees growing exponentially. 150,000 across the border in turkey. also jordan mostly women and children. in the long term what will we do with these people on top of th
envoy for syria he was in russia and today he's in egypt. what specifically is he trying to accomplish? >> well, he's in egypt today to report back to the arab league and to the secretary-general of the arab league and his findings from his diplomatic trips these past few days. he was in syria meeting with other figures and then brahimi went to moscow where he met with the foreign minister. the foreign minister of russia as well as brahimi urged all sides to come to the table but the fighting still rages on in syria. now, today, we heard just in the last hour from brahimi. he actually said in cairo that the situation is so bad in syria that now we have close to 50,000 people killed there in the nearly two years of war. by next year, up to 100,000. there is an opportunity of parties to come together, but not going to last forever and the situation there is getting more and more dire every single day. alison? >> with it getting more dire, really any likelihood of a cease-fire or will syria's president step down? >> it doesn't look as though syria's president is ready to step down. one of
is holding an unscheduled meeting in ireland with the special envoy to syria. it is a sign that russia may be switching sides to put pressure on syria to stop the fighting. margaret brennan is in dublin covering those talks. good morning, margaret. do you think this is a sign of a diplomatic breakthrough? >> reporter: norah, it's a sign of a possible diplomatic breakthrough. u.n. envoy to syria is flying here to dublin for this last-minute meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton and the russian foreign minister. it may signal that russia is finally willing to take u.n. action to send a message to bashar al assad to stop the killing. russia one of syria's few remaining allies and so far have agreed to any interactions to stop the killing of thousands of people. >> charlie rose here. the reporting that they're mixing the ingredients for chemical weapons influence what the russians may be doing? >> reporter: the russian foreign minister says that the outside russian government -- syrian government assures them that they are rumors. russia wants to be part of wha
relationship with russia. i think it was a vote on my behalf and others to say we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia to show that that vote was juft, this is an opportunity to show the international community at large you can be a constructive force at a time of great need and you have the capability to do some good. i find it ironic and red lines are talked about, but the red line here is literally red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me is the most we are all fixated on the method of killing, not the killing itself. for over a year, we have been talking about getting involved and need to stop this before it gets out of hand. we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. it will be hard to go to the syrian people when they achieve their freedom and say we would like to help you and they will say, you did little at a time in our debatest need. we have a chance to correct that impression. from an american national security point of view, if we don't secure these chem
's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warn
charged with attempted espy naj tonight. the alleged benefactor was russia. the war on drugs? have we lost it? let's go "outfront." good evening. a bright idea brought to us by the liberal former governor of vermont, howard dean. the man who brought us the scream heard round the world when he ran for president. yeah! >> dean says let's face it, america. taxes need to go up for everyone. now, this might not be what you expect from someone like howard dean. it's certainly not the president's position or the position of most americans. another new poll out today shows most people like the president's ideas of only raising taxes on other people, specifically the top 2%. individuals making over $200,000 a year or families making over $250,000 a year. the problem is according to the congressional research service, the math doesn't add up. that tax hike would give $678 billion in additional revenue over ten years. remember, we're $16 trillion in the debt hole. if we go with howard dean's idea, we have $2.8 trillion for 17% of the debt. adam davidson is the co-founder of npr's planet money, and he
of albania and russia are quite different. it was more the -- in many cases actually it was the degree to which civil society and those society had been maintained or reconstructed that made the big difference between how well they recovered. >> civil society can be quite nasty itself. a lot of the most, the nastiest islamist groups in the middle east tend to be very rich, civil society organizations that provide social welfare and they happen to believe in very extreme form of islam and there are parallels in europe as well. >> the interesting thing about islam, the islamist movements in that part of the world are at an important turning point. until now, they've had a lot of credit, if you will, and a lot of the populations put a lot of faith in them because they were the only alternative to the government. i mean, either because they were somehow tolerated or because they were able to be more powerful because they had access to mosques and better ways of organizing people. they were often the only civil society organizations that were allowed to be functioning. now that the regimes
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 190 (some duplicates have been removed)

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